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19 Aug Invisible Documentary Viewing

invisible documentary viewing

 

In one of the most genius ideas of the summer, our D Moms Daily wellness expert Dr. Kate Naumes, ND has launched a monthly documentary viewing series at her office on the Katy Trail.

The next viewing takes place this Saturday, August 24 at 6 p.m. featuring Invisible, filmmaker Roz Mortimer’s beautiful and thought-provoking film that follows Inuit mothers and the challenges they face as harmful chemicals from their food begin to surface in their breast milk.

Space for the viewing is limited, so be sure to RSVP to frontdesk.naumes.nd@gmail.com if you’re planning to attend!

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29 Jun The Power of Family Dinner

Power of Family Dinner

As part of our continuing pursuit in finding that elusive balance, I wanted to touch on the importance of family dinners. The good news is that research shows that adolescents and parents perceive family meals positively. It looks as though family meals could be a useful mechanism for enhancing family togetherness. They’re also good platforms for parents to model behaviors that they would like their children to emulate.

For younger kids, the benefits are further motivating… Wouldn’t we all love to enjoy our kids again, instilling in them more grace and courtesy as we prepare them for the privilege of an enjoyable dinner at a restaurant? (Getting them to eat more fresh more fruits and vegetables would be nice too.)

Read on for some tips for creating that vital ritual of family dinner:

Before dinner:

  • Set a regular dinnertime.
  • Take on fewer activities if these are getting the way of family dinner.
  • Prepare (or pick up pre-made) food to eat together at home.
  • Include children in setting the table (a toddler placemat can empower littles to set the table).
  • Turn off the TV and music and remove technology/phones/tablets from the table.
  • Light a candle and/or dim the lights.
  • Say a prayer or express gratitude for your time together and for the food.

To read more of Dr. Naumes’ posts head over to D-Moms Blog.

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11 Jun Turn on Some Tunes

Turn on Some Tunes

Everyday the energy my (almost) 3-year-old son expels makes my jaw drop. Music is one of the tools my husband David and I often use to channel this boundless energy.

I’m lucky that said husband is a composer and plays the guitar beautifully. From the moment we found out we were pregnant – almost 4 years ago now – David has been singing to our son. Back then, at night before we went to bed, David would make “whale sounds” on my belly to calm our growing baby down so I could get some sleep.

Here are my suggestions for using music to joyfully rein in that, at times, overwhelming kid energy in a way that helps us cultivate peace and connection.

I’ve divided this up into a daily ritual because “transitions” and other stressful times during the day offer great opportunities to stop for a moment and honor the shift from one activity to another… Music could be used a background, but it’s even more effective when there is an official music break.

Morning Music:

  • Some mornings we put recordings of birdsong on to help wake up – seems as though it helps us get out the door since it sounds as if we already are! Feel free to flap your wings like a bird.
  • Once a week, my husband leads a drum circle at our little one’s school in Oak Cliff. An empty water cooler container makes a great makeshift hand drum – you can’t really destroy it! Drumming gives my husband time to connect with our son and watch him interact with his little friends.

Head over to D-Mom’s Blog to read more of Dr. Naumes’ music suggestions.

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28 May Cocoa is Good for Your Brain (Really!)

Cocoa is Good for Your Brain (Really!)

By Dr. Deneb Bates, ND

Taking steps to promote and protect brain health is important at any age. Short-term and long-term brain health is greatly determined by how we live, the choices we make, and the foods we eat. Fetal brain formation during pregnancy; childhood brain growth, development, mood, and function; and cognitive longevity in our adult years can all be impacted, either positively or negatively, by how we live our lives.

Pregnancy
Pregnancy is a critical time for brain development. It is important for a pregnant mother to have optimal nutrition so that her baby’s brain develops properly. Some of the most important nutrients for brain formation during pregnancy include adequate folic acid and Omega-3 essential fatty acids, particularly DHA. Folic acid is naturally found in green vegetables, like spinach and asparagus, and is also abundant in beans such as black-eyed peas and red kidney beans. Pregnant women should also supplement with a pre-natal vitamin to assure adequate folic acid intake during pregnancy.

DHA is an essential fatty acid that is especially important in brain and central nervous system development as well eye health. The standard American diet does not contain enough DHA for optimal health. Food sources rich in DHA include wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, and anchovies. A quality fish oil supplement is an option for people who don’t eat fish regularly.

To read more of Dr. Bates’ post head over to D-Mom’s Blog.

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22 May Dr. Naumes Helps Demystify Sun Protection

Demystify Sun Protection

Are you confused about which sunscreen is the best for you and your family? Have questions about the dangers of too much sun exposure? When it comes to trying to protect yourself from the sun, it’s easy to go crazy.

Many products carry confusing claims or contain ingredients that could pose health risks. The FDA has just recently updated the rules for sunscreen labeling, however its standards are still weak compared to Europe and other parts of the world. In the mistaken belief that sunscreen alone will protect them from skin cancer risks, many people fail to seek shade and cover up in protective clothing, hats, and sunglasses.

Though some studies seem to suggest that sunscreen may help prevent certain cancers, there is mounting evidence that sunscreen might increase the risk of the deadliest form of skin cancer, melanoma, for some people. Researchers speculate that this may be because sunscreen users tend to stay out in the sun longer than those that don’t use sunscreen. Alternatively, it may be the chemicals in the sunscreens themselves.

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Mom’s Blog.

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15 May Natural Remedies for Spring Allergies

Natural Remedies for Spring Allergies

This time of year, Dallas women often ask me if I can help them with their allergies. They are tired of taking Zyrtec, Claritin, or Benadryl on a regular basis and unhappy with the side effects that sometimes accompany such medications. For women that have experienced some of those side effects – such as headaches, fatigue, and even a possible (though so far unproven) connection to infertility – there is often a strong desire to understand why the allergies exist in the first place and what options are available beyond simply masking the symptoms.

 

‘Allergies’ is a term commonly applied to symptoms such as runny nose, conjunctivitis, asthma, hives, or eczema that often occur in association with a season or exposure to certain foods or substances like pollens, pet dander, or dust. In fact, a wide variety of symptoms and systems may be involved in allergic or ‘sensitivity’ reactions that occur when a person’s immune system no longer tolerates seemingly harmless substances. Although some allergies are fixed, correcting imbalances can minimize the severity of symptoms. Indeed, other sensitivities may be reversed entirely with the proper attention.

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at the D-Moms Blog.

 

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