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08 May An Open Letter to Sheryl Sandberg From Dr. Kate Naumes ND

Open Letter Sheryul Sandberg

Dear Sheryl,

I enjoyed the letter that Alexandra Chang wrote to you in the latest issue of WIRED – it has inspired me to write one of my own. I want to tell you what I think about your enlightening new book urging women not to shy away from ambition and leadership. But first, a little bit about why I’m writing you…

Since my teenage years, I’ve felt strongly that women had something particular to contribute to a healthier world. For my undergraduate studies, I choose Mount Holyoke College – a beautiful, rural all women’s college – in hopes of finding role models that would inspire, create, and contribute to a more feminine world. I hoped these role models could help me figure out how to find the freedom to be my best self and support other women to do the same. While studying Biochemistry didn’t exactly get me any closer to that goal, it was a part of my path to naturopathic medical school and midwifery, where it seemed I’d finally found a feminine paradigm for medicine that supported women to be free of the beliefs that don’t promote self-love.

Now that I’ve just finished reading your book, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead, I must say that I’m heartened by many of your suggestions and glad to see you open up a new chapter in the ongoing conversation about women, work, and family.  As you point out, thirty years after women became 50 percent of the college graduates in the United States, men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in government and industry. And so, I think it’s important that you are encouraging women to “sit at the table,” to seek challenges, take risks, and pursue their goals.

That said, I don’t think it’s enough to offer strategies for women to better succeed mostly by acting like men in a man’s world. Rather, for women to be better represented in government, higher education, corporate boardrooms, and public life, I think we need to reimagine what work looks like.

Read the rest of Dr. Naumes’ letter over at DMoms Blog.

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22 Mar Tips on Eating Healthy When You’re Eating Out

Eating Healthy When Eating Out

So you just walked in to that healthy new restaurant/juice bar/locally-sourced-what-have-you everyone’s been talking about. You comment to your dining companion how fortunate we are to have these establishments popping up here in Dallas! Since, everything is local, organic, freshly made (or at least not processed), it must all be good for you, right?

Not necessarily…

If you’re not a 20 year old in perfect health, the answer may be more nuanced that you might think. Why? Because the very same foods travel through our very different bodies in unique ways due to our specific hormonal and metabolic makeups. So yes, as a general guideline for eating healthy, I wholeheartedly agree with author Michael Pollen’s memorable quote “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” But if you have have a disease, are having pregnancy related difficulties, have diabetes, are overweight, or if your body is out of balance and you have a health problem trying to solve it on your own with the aid of the latest diet trend may not have the intended effect that you desire.

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazine’s D-Moms Blog.

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13 Mar Build Your Own Wellness Library

Wellness Library

 

These days, the amount of wellness related books out there competing for your eyeballs is staggering. Every book can be a rabbit hole leading towards another set of rabbit holes, and on and on…  So while this list of some of my favorite books is by no means be exhaustive, I do want to highlight a few books that I’ve found to be particularly eye opening, as well as a few that I return to over and over again.

Herewith 7 of my go-to reads grouped by “heart,” “mind,” and “body,” plus a bonus book:

Heart

  • The Omnivore’s Dilemma
    This book is an exquisitely organized exploration of my ‘Why?’ In exploring the food chains that sustain us, Michael Pollan asks questions that have profound political, economic, psychological and moral implications.
  • The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell
    In his history of New York City (via the renowned oyster beds of the Hudson River), Mark Kurlansky raises interesting points about city planning, human impact on our environment and how we might live more sustainably. I’m hoping he’s working on one about water and Texas.

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ favorite reads over at D-Magazine’s D-Moms Blog.

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05 Mar Dr. Naumes Talks Breast Feeding

Breast Feeding

 

This week, I’m finishing up our closeness series talking about a kind of intimacy with which many moms will be very familiar – the intimacy of breast feeding. There is overwhelming evidence that breast milk is the best food for your newborn. Unfortunately, not all moms can produce just the right amount of milk for their baby. Some women make more milk than they need, while others don’t make enough.

If  you are looking to increase breast milk production the following may be your first steps:

  • Get a good hospital grade pump (I like the Medela Symphony 2.0)
  • Sleep with your new baby at night
  • Stay hydrated
  • Decrease your stress
  • Hire a lactation consultant or ND-midwife experienced in lactation support
  • Speak with someone knowledgeable about appropriate milk augmenting herbs

If you find that the above simply doesn’t generate enough milk for your baby (in spite of your best efforts) consider alternatives to organic formula like milk banks and milk sharing. I’m not anti-formula in any and every situation — I just want you to know there are options!

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazines DMoms Blog

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