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15 Jan Optimizing Your Fertility

Optimizing Your Fertility

This week we’ll talk about some ways to naturally improve your fertility. As an added bonus, achieving your optimal state of health before getting pregnant makes it more likely that you will have a healthy, glowing pregnancy and a healthier baby.

The year leading up to pregnancy is a key window for making changes that support radiant health, inner beauty, and optimal fertility. Some of these changes might sound like your new year’s resolutions, so if you’re trying to get pregnant, here’s extra motivation to stick with them!

    1. Start decreasing your exposure to harmful chemicals now.
      • Reduce the pesticides that you ingest by choosing organic fruits and vegetables
      • Use all-natural body products, choose green cleaners for your home, and never dry-clean your clothes.

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D Magazines D-Moms Blog

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18 Dec Girl Time Might be the Healthiest Thing You do all Month

 

 

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The hectic holiday schedule affords many opportunities to gather with family and friends. While it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the stress of the season, taking time to relax with friends turns out to be vital for good health. This week, we’ll talk about the whole-body benefits of good friendships. Research shows that people who have strong social connections also have:

  • Better cardiovascular health
  • Lower risk of colds and depression
  • Lower overall stress and healthier ways of coping with stress
  • A stronger immune system
  • Better insulin regulation

Good friendships also provide long-term brain benefits. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health of adults aged 65+ found that social interactions keep the brain sharp in later life.

While difficult relationships with friends and family members have been linked to negative health effects, positive relationships give people a greater sense of happiness and well-being. Numerous studies show that happy people live longer, healthier lives. Momentary pleasures, such as laughing with a dear friend, can improve overall happiness levels, which include a deep sense of life satisfaction, optimism, positive emotions, and the absence of negative emotions.

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazines D-Moms Blog

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12 Dec Benefits of Naturopathic Care

Benefits of Naturopathic Care

 

Increasing levels of chronic disease including: diabetes, heart disease, chronic pain, cancer, and obesity, have created a multi-trillion dollar financial burden on the medical system. Naturopathic medicine (referring to NDs from accredited medical schools) may reduce the need for expensive conventional care by promoting health and decreasing the need for medical interventions over the long term. Naturopathic doctors are primary care providers that treat acute and chronic conditions as well as address health promotion and disease prevention.

Today I’m going to breakdown three major benefits of Naturopathic care.

 

Naturopathic medicine costs less than conventional care.

  • A 2006 University of Washington study found that in Washington state, naturopathic care cost insurers $9.00 per enrollee vs. $686.00 for conventional care. (2)
  • One year of a lifestyle intervention program (similar to that recommended by naturopathic physicians) for patients with coronary artery disease not only improved all health outcomes and reduced the need for surgery but also cost significantly less then conventional treatment ($7,000 vs $31,000 –$46,000). (4)
  • Naturopathic care, when used for reduction of cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure and cholesterol, for example) improved health and increased job productivity and was determined to actually be a cost-saver for an employer. (5)
  • Naturopathic care used for chronic low back pain not only cost less than a standard physical therapy regimen but also decreased absenteeism by up to 7 days in a worker’s year. (6)

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazines D-Moms Blog

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04 Dec The Sleep/Weight Loss Connection

Sleep/Weight Loss Connection

 

This month, we’ll talk about the effects that sleeping more, getting adequate vitamin D, and spending time with friends can have on your health. We’ll finish up the year with a look at the importance of Naturopathic care.

This week we’re going to walk through the very real benefits of getting shut eye (and what happens when we don’t get it). Over and over again in my practice, I find that the main reasons moms are not getting enough sleep typically involve one or more of the following:

  • a lack of understanding of the importance of sleep.
  • inadequate scheduling (not making shut-eye a priority).
  • insomnia.
  • anxiety.
  • sleep interruptions from little ones not sleeping well.

Let’s start with sleep and fat loss. I prefer to focus on fat loss with its emphasis on healthy body composition (ideal body fat and adequate muscle mass) rather than weight loss (which too often focuses on a number on the scale).

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazine’s D-Moms Blog.

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02 Dec Optimizing Water Intake

My hope this week is that during the holidays when you want to grab that second cup of coffee or that third glass of holiday cheer, you’ll think about choosing a glass of filtered water to help make you a better you!  And if you need more help making these habits a reality in your life, don’t hesitate to get help making it happen.

  • At least half of your daily fluid should come from water. More is fine—up to 100% of your daily beverage needs.
  • About one-third (or about three to four cups) can come from unsweetened organic coffee or tea. If you flavor your coffee or tea with a lot of sugar, cream, or whole milk, then drinking less would help manage weight. If you don’t drink coffee or tea, choose water instead to make up this one-third.
  • Harvard School of Public Health says milk can make up another 20 percent, or about two eight-ounce glasses. Less is my suggestion, just make sure you get your calcium from another source.  As an aside, dark leafy greens or dried beans, have varying amounts of absorbable calcium. Calcium supplements often contain vitamin D; taking calcium paired with vitamin D seems to be more beneficial for bone health than taking calcium alone.
  • A small glass (four ounces) of 100% organic unsweetened fruit juice OR no more than one to two alcoholic drinks for men or no more than one for women. (That means no alcohol at night ladies if you had orange juice at breakfast. )
  • Ideally, it’s best to completely cut out drinks sweetened with sugar, artificial sweeteners or high-fructose corn syrup.

REFERENCES

1. Popkin BM, Armstrong LE, Bray GM, Caballero B, Frei B, Willett WC. A new proposed guidance system for beverage consumption in the United States. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2006; 83:529-542.

2. Kuriyama S, Shimazu T, Ohmori K, Kikuchi N, Nakaya N, Nishino Y, Tsubono Y, Tsuji I. Green tea consumption and mortality due to cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all causes in Japan: the Ohsaki study. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2006; 296:1255-1265.

3. Van Dam RM, Willett WC, Manson JE, Hu FB. Coffee, caffeine, and risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective cohort study in younger and middle-aged U.S. women. Diabetes Care. 2006; 29:398-403.

4. Starbucks beverage details: Mint Mocha Chip Frappuccino® blended coffee with Chocolate Whipped Cream. Accessed on March 28, 2009.

5. Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2004. Accessed on March 28, 2009.

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30 Nov Guide to Safe Drinking Water

This week let’s talk about getting that dewy glow from drinking more clean filtered tap water. Goodbye luminizer! Hello sleep and water!

Even though, relatively speaking, Big D has better tap water than most cities (#12 on the Environmental Working Group’s list), agricultural pollutants, carcinogens, and endocrine disruptors are some of the common pollutants that still show up in Dallas’ drinking water. Endocrine disruptors can negatively impact a couple’s chance of conceiving, as well as presenting risks to the endocrine system (which includes ovaries and thyroid). This isn’t a luxury either, getting rid of your exposure to endocrine disruptors by filtering your water may be the difference between you getting pregnant again or not. And if you thought drinking bottled water was the solution, think again – bottled water is almost always worse. (Buying bottled water is akin to you buying your own tap water and then putting it into a plastic bottle that later goes into a landfill.) Instead, let’s take a look at the EWG’s Guide to Safe Drinking Water excerpted and condensed below:

  • Tap Water: Learn what’s in it.
    • Tap water suppliers publish all their water quality tests. Bottled water companies don’t.
  • Filtered Tap Water: Drink it, cook with it.
  • Filters: Change them.
  • Bottled Water: Drink filtered tap water instead.
  • On the Go: Carry water in safe containers.
  • While Pregnant: Stay hydrated with safe water.
  • Infants: Use safe water for formula.
  • Breathe Easy: Use a whole house water filter.


Now that you have the 411 on optimizing water intake for you and your family, (not to mention your developing baby if you happen to be pregnant), it’s important to point out that replacing your sodas and alcohol with your clean water will work wonders. Ok, check back with me soon to educate yourself on how much water to drink, how often, and why it is important!

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